Judge: Parents can sell home of daughter, 37, because they supplied cash

In a ruling Tuesday, a judge in Vancouver sided with the parents in a dispute over a home they had helped buy for their 37-year-old daughter.

The parents wanted the home put up for sale because they ran into tax trouble and needed to access some cash, according to a report.

But the daughter balked, claiming it was “her” home, even though the parents had paid $110,000 of the cost. (It was unclear what percentage of the cost the dollar figure represented.)

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“We were never vindictive ...?but we’ve lost our daughter now. I just don’t know how it can be repaired because it’s done so much damage."

The dispute has reportedly ripped the Canadian family apart.

“We were fair,” the mother told the Vancouver Sun. “We were never vindictive to (our daughter), but we’ve lost our daughter now. I just don’t know how it can be repaired because it’s done so much damage.”

The daughter’s lawyer said there would be no comment from her, the newspaper reported.

According to the Sun, the court case revealed that whenever their adult son and daughter needed something, their parents were supportive.

The parents reportedly paid for their children’s education and their vehicles, covered the cost of their daughter’s elective surgery and helped finance homes for both of them.

(AP)

In the son’s case, the home financing was a loan that the son repaid.

The daughter, however, argued that the land title, tax bills and day-to-day care of the property all suggested that she was the rightful owner.

In his ruling, British Columbia Supreme Court Justice Robert Punnett noted that the case was made more difficult because – as is the case with many family financial arrangements – documentation was lacking, and the bitterness resulting from the dispute made it difficult to assess the credibility of the family members.

The outlet explained that the parents had advanced $110,000 to help their daughter buy the property while she was studying at Royal Roads University and "wanted to maximize their investment by making the property their daughter’s principle residence."

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Ultimately, the judge ordered that the home be sold, with the parents in charge, and that neither the daughter nor her representatives interfere with the sale.

The court ruling issued to the public identified the family members only by their initials, the Vancouver Sun reported.